Hypnosis Coma Communication Part Three – Perseverance

Hypnosis Coma Communication Part Three – Perseverance

Hypnosis Coma Communication Part Three – Perseverance

 

Hello again all you dedicated caregivers who generously help your comatose students learn how to coma communicate. This article completes the series and is called coma communication perseverance.

Please review the video and this blog post to understand the value of persevering. Do your best to optimistically stay the course. To the best of your ability, (yes, I know you may feel exhausted), keep focused on how you can help your student.

The following outline suggests more ideas you can help your student develop ability to consciously hear you and respond to the outside world. This empowers your student and helps naturally reduce inner stress.

  1. When nothing seems to be getting through or progress seems slower than what YOU’D personally prefer, persevere.       You may feel frustrated but persevere anyway. Your student is counting on your being his or her continued lifeline to consciousness.
  2. If you feel like blowing your top, go ahead and blow it! But do it outside of the room where your student is. This is a labor of love. If that were you in a coma, would you want your coach to persevere?
  3. Be an active listener and observer. Keep writing in a journal about the progress.   Ask the family to write in a journal of their own. Journal writing may help you and the family figure out what new things to try when you compare notes.
  4. Start each coaching session by assessing your student’s ability level for the day or sometimes for the moment.       People in coma DO hear you. They need help finding a way to respond. So, mind what you say.  Be encouraging, uplifting, optimistic and celebrate progress, no matter how small. This motivates your student to keep moving forward and continue to develop ability.
  5. Students may only respond with eye movements, changes in respiration rates or other physical body subtleties. Because brain damage affects all body functions in some way, be patient and observe changes when you suggest an idea.       Set up a response method.  Using a response method you can measure progress.
  6. A response method varies from student to student. If you say to your student, “Can you blink your eyes once to answer “yes” to a question?” and you see no immediate eye blink response, wait and observe. Look for changes in respiration, pulse rate, or same body part movement other than the eyes. Same body part movement might be a right handed index finger moving slightly. If there is a consistent movement somewhere, THAT is the response method your student can exhibit for the time being. This can change at a later time.
  7. Make responding easy for your student. Let him or her respond in his or her own way. For now, that might be the ONLY sensory response body action he or she can use to answer and communicate with you.
  8. Understand and believe your student always demonstrates potential. Focus on your student’s potential to improve his or her quality of life.  This potential can be measured successfully by realistic expectations of your student’s ability levels from moment to moment.
  9. Understand that most movement exhausts your student.       Therefore, you may only be able to have one minute (or less) sessions at a time. Only you can identify how able your student is during the session when it comes to these communication sessions. Challenge, but do not force your student to keep moving forward. When you make the session a challenge that can be achieved by your student, he or she stretches and develops ability.  Or, if humor is appropriate, pretend you are a game show host. This method can only be used if you know your student well enough to bring humor in. The challenge is like an entertaining game rather than a dreaded, tedious task.
  10. Imagine yourself as being a coma communication game coach. If you see yourself as a tutor who feels like these interactions are a burden to be begrudgingly dealt with, you may fail to help your student develop skill and ability to improve quality of life.
  11. Your attitude will either make or break each session. You are NOT here to be entertained by your student. You are a COACH, focused on helping your student achieve consciousness goals by communicating. Any other attitude than expecting success will cause backslides and setbacks for your student.
  12. This concludes the video and blog post series about coma communication caregiving. For now, please review the contents of this series and the other two videos. I encourage you to get my book The Coma Whisperer at the marketplace section on this website. For those with questions, please email me at brainviewtraininginstitute@gmail.com.

 

 

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